OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

Hinkle Creek

Patterns of Coastal Cutthroat Trout Survival in Two Headwater Stream Networks
Berger, A. M.
Jun-21-2007

Mark-recapture methods were used to examine watershed-scale survival rates of coastal cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii clarkii) from two headwater stream networks located in the foothills of the Cascade Mountain Range, Oregon. Differences in survival were explored among spatial (stream segment, stream network [main stem or tributaries], and watershed) and temporal (season and year) analytical scales and assessed among specific abiotic (discharge, temperature, and cover) and biotic (length, growth, condition, density, and movement) factors. A total of 1,725 adult coastal cutthroat trout (>100 mm, FL) were implanted with half-duplex PIT (passive integrated transponder) tags and monitored seasonally over a 3-year period using a combination of electrofishing, portable remote tracking antennas, and stationary antennas. The effects of watershed, stream network, season, year, and fish length were the most important factors among the candidate survival models. The greatest source of variation in survival was associated with year-dependent differences among seasons. There was evidence suggesting that survival was negatively associated with periods of low stream discharge and with individual fish length. In addition, low (-) and high (+) extreme stream temperatures and boulder cover (+) were weakly associated with survival.

DISCIPLINE: Fisheries    STUDY: Hinkle Creek    TYPE: Theses    TAGS: coastal cutthroat trout, survival, passive integrated transponder, electrofishing, portable remote tracking antennas, Seasonal survival, stream discharge, fish length, boulder cover
Nutrient Dynamics
Meininger, W. S.
Apr-03-2013

Nutrients are one of the factors which limit primary production and can be a water pollutant. Fertilizer can be applied to increase the Nitrogen and therefore increase the growth. The Hinkle Creek Paired Watershed Study addresses concerns about the loss of essential plant nutrients in Douglas-fir plantations and assesses the impacts of forest management on stream water chemistry of fish-bearing streams. The objective is to determine the cumulative impacts to fish-bearing streams of non-fish-bearing streams which are not afforded the protection of un-harvested and unfertilized riparian strips and to compare those impacts with the local impacts of different treatments.

DISCIPLINE: Hydrology & Water Quality    STUDY: Hinkle Creek    TYPE: Presentations    TAGS: Nutrients, Primary Production, Contemporary Forest Management, Paired Watershed, Nitrate Response, Longitudinal attenuation
Local and Downstream Effects of Contemporary Forest Harvesting on Streamflow and Sediment Yield
Zégre, N. P.
Nov-19-2008

This dissertation is a collection of three manuscripts that serve to fill the knowledge gaps and advance methods of detecting the effects of contemporary forest harvesting in experimental catchment studies. The objective of this research was to develop change detection models using time-series records to detect and quantify the effects of forest harvesting on streamflow and sediment yield. To accomplish this, it was necessary to characterize streamflow and sediment processes at a temporal scale capable of describing daily, monthly, and seasonal dynamics following forest harvesting; increase sample sizes used to construct regression-based change detection models; and develop alternative methods to the paired-catchment approach in order to discern changes in streamflow and sediment using highly variable time-series data. The paired-catchment approach was used to detect and quantify relative changes in streamflow and sediment yield in 5 harvested catchments. The ability to detect statistically significant changes at certain time-steps was a function of accounting for all sources of variability in change detection models. In this study, we aimed to develop robust change detection models using time-series data to increase sample size and decrease false/missed detections of true treatment effects.

DISCIPLINE: Hydrology & Water Quality    STUDY: Alsea, Hinkle Creek, Trask    TYPE: Theses    TAGS: forest harvesting, contemporary harvesting practices, detection models, paired-catchment, sediment yield
On the Estimation and Application of Spatial and Temporal Autocorrelation in Headwater Streams
Som, N.
Sep-02-2009

This collection of three manuscripts serves to improve methods for collecting, interpreting, and utilizing autocorrelated data from headwater stream networks. Two chapters of this work relied on a unique and comprehensive set of data which constitutes a complete census of habitat unit fish counts from 40 randomly selected headwater basins in western Oregon. The first objective of this work was to evaluate how different sampling designs captured spatial autocorrelation, given the samples were drawn from a population of spatially autocorrelated observations. The second objective was to investigate spatial autocorrelation model range parameters as measures of patch sizes. The third objective was to refine the analysis of temporally autocorrelated hydrology data from paired watershed studies. These  are used to evaluate forest harvesting effects on stream biota and hydrology (i.e. fish, amphibians, insects, stream flow, and sediment yield).

DISCIPLINE: Hydrology & Water Quality    STUDY: Alsea, Hinkle Creek, Trask    TYPE: Theses    TAGS: autocorrelated data, headwater stream networks, Spatial autocorrelation, patch size, paired watershed studies
Exploring the Differences between Lagrangian and Eulerian Reference Frames for Stream Temperature Data
Egan, F.
Aug-12-2011

Stream temperature research relies on reference frames in which to project data. An important decision in the project design is which frame of reference to use. This aspect of research planning is not always given the consideration of thought that would lead to the best decision. In this thesis, two frames of references (Eulerian and Lagrangian) are compared in order to garner a better understanding of whether the choice of one reference frame over the other leads to a difference in the interpretation of the stream temperature data. The Eulerian and Lagrangian reference frames were compared through a series of graphs in which the data was projected on both reference frames. In two dimensions of space and temperature, the interpretation between the Eulerian and Lagrangian reference frames are fairly similar. When the third dimension of time was graphed alongside temperature and space, the interpretations of the data differed between reference frames. All three dimensions should be considered when choosing a reference frame for research projects. The appropriate reference frame to use depends on the statements that need to be made about the data at the conclusion of the study.

DISCIPLINE: Hydrology & Water Quality    STUDY: Hinkle Creek    TYPE: Theses    TAGS: Reference frame, Eulerian, Lagrangian, Hydrology, Stream temperature
Sampling Headwater Stream Networks for Spatial Autocorrelation Detection and Autocovariance Parameter Estimation
Som, N., L.M. Ganio, R.E. Gresswell, D. Hockman-Wert
Dec-15-2010

Spatial autocorrelation is common in data collected for ecological studies, and the use of statistical models for spatial autocorrelation has evolved. Initially, these models were used to improve linear model parameter estimation uncertainty, but more recently ecologists have considered spatial autocorrelation as a valuable tool for describing ecological patterns. The structure and water-driven continuity of stream-networks makes these landscapes unique, and has prompted development of new models for describing spatial autocorrelation within these networks. We evaluate the spatial autocorrelation detection and parameter estimation of four sampling protocols applied to complete censuses of coastal cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii clarkii) habitat unit fish counts. We consider two cluster- and two non cluster-based sampling protocols. Spatially distributed clusters were the most apt to contain spatial autocorrelation. Spatial autocorrelation detection was also associated with headwater basin attributes. Differences among sampling protocols in regards to autocorrelation parameter estimation were less distinct.

DISCIPLINE: Fisheries    STUDY: Hinkle Creek    TYPE: Journal Articles    TAGS: Spatial autocorrelation, parameter estimation, cluster-based sampling protocols
Effect of contemporary forest harvesting practices on headwater stream temperatures: Initial response of the Hinkle Creek catchment, Pacific Northwest
Kibler Kelly M., Skaugset, Arne, Ganio, Lisa M., Huso, Manuela M.
Oct-04-2013

We investigated the effect of contemporary forest harvesting practices on warm-season thermal regimes of headwater streams using a Before-After-Control-Intervention (BACI) design within a nested, paired watershed study. We applied harvesting treatments to four headwater tributaries of Hinkle Creek, designed in accordance with the Oregon Forest Practices Act. Therefore, fixed-width buffer strips containing overstory merchantable trees were not left adjacent to the four non-fish-bearing streams. The summer following harvesting, we observed a variable temperature response across the four harvested streams. Mean maximum daily stream temperatures ranged from 1.5 C cooler to 1.0 C warmer relative to pre-harvest years. We also observed significantly lower minimum and mean daily stream temperatures, and recorded particularly low temperatures in treatment streams on days that minimum stream temperatures in reference streams were high. At the watershed scale, we did not observe cumulative stream temperature effects related to harvesting 14% of the watershed area in multiple, spatially-distributed harvest units across four headwater catchments. At the watershed outlet, we observed no change to maximum, mean, or minimum daily stream temperatures. We attribute the lack of consistent temperature increases in headwater streams to shading provided by a layer of logging slash that deposited over the streams during harvesting, and to increased summer baseflows.

DISCIPLINE: Hydrology & Water Quality    STUDY: Hinkle Creek    TYPE: Journal Articles    TAGS: Stream temperature, Forest management, Canopy closure, Impact assessment, Headwater streams, Cumulative effects, Hinkle, Oregon, Paired Watershed, Forest Hydrology
WRC Conference Abstracts
Apr-18-2013

Abstracts for (most) of the presentations given at the WRC Conference in April 2013.

DISCIPLINE: Disciplinary Results    STUDY: Alsea, Hinkle Creek, Trask    TYPE: Reports    TAGS: Abstracts, Conference
WRC Conference Agenda
Apr-18-2013

The agenda of the 2013 WRC Conference with presentation titles and speakers listed.

DISCIPLINE: Disciplinary Results    STUDY: Alsea, Hinkle Creek, Trask    TYPE: Reports    TAGS: Agenda, Conference, WRC

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