OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

Disciplinary Results

A Synthesis of the Impacts of Contemporary Forest Practices on Aquatic Ecosystems at a Watershed Scale: A Case Study from Hinkle Creek
Skaugset, A., M. Adams, D. Bateman, K. Cromack, L. Ganio, and B. Gerth
Apr-18-2013

The Hinkle Creek Paired Watershed Study was initiated to carry out two overarching goals: to investigate the environmental impact of contemporary forest practices on non-fish-bearing streams and downstream in tributary and main stem fish-bearing streams. This presentation serves as a summary of some of the results for the studies in Hinkle Creek.  Statistically significant increases in water yield, summer low flows, peak flows, and storm flows were detected as a consequence of timber harvest and the subsequent silvicultural activities. Statistically significant increases in sediment yield were also detected. The increases in sediment yield were not consistent with the literature; however they were highly correlated with the observed increases in water yield. Statistically significant increases and decreases were detected in maximum and minimum daily stream temperatures in the non-fish-bearing tributaries, fish-bearing tributaries, and the main stem as a consequence of the two harvest entries. Statistically significant increases in nitrogen were detected as a consequence of the timber harvest and the subsequent silvicultural activities. Nitrogen was the only nutrient that responded to the silvicultural activities. In Hinkle Creek the pacific giant salamander was the only amphibian that was abundant enough to study. In the two years after the first harvest entry, the data did not support the hypothesis that there was any change in the abundance of salamanders.

DISCIPLINE: Disciplinary Results    STUDY: Hinkle Creek    TYPE: Presentations    TAGS: Paired Watershed, Watershed Hydrology, sediment yield, Stream temperature, Stream Chemistry
Setting the Landscape Context for Paired Watershed Studies in Western Oregon
Bax, T.V.
Apr-01-2008

Paired watershed studies provide valuable scientific understanding of the effects of disturbance on aquatic resources. Geographic information system (GIS) tools, combined with principal components and cluster analyses, were used to develop a landscape classification of forested headwater basins in order to support these paired watershed studies. Spatial and statistical analyses were applied to landform, geologic texture, forest cover, and climate variables that describe the biophysical and climatic setting of forested headwater catchments (300 – 58,000 km2) in western Oregon. Cluster analysis isolated 5 groups that account for major differences in environmental conditions across the landscape, but have a large ratio of among to within group dissimilarity. The first and second principal component axes correlate most strongly to differences in slope and elevation, and the percent coniferous tree cover and past harvest, respectively.

DISCIPLINE: Disciplinary Results    STUDY: Alsea, Hinkle Creek, Trask    TYPE: Theses    TAGS: Geographic information system (GIS), slope, elevation, Harvest
Sediment Symposium: Quantifying In-Stream Sediment and Biotic Responses Presentation Videos
Jan-24-2013

At the Sediment Symposium, researchers review and summarize our overall understanding of current scientific knowledge of in-stream sediment. The video archive of the presentations is available.

To view the presentations, please visit this website:  http://oregonstate.edu/conferences/event/2013sedimentsummit/videoarchive...

DISCIPLINE: Disciplinary Results    STUDY: Alsea, Hinkle Creek, Trask    TYPE: Presentations    TAGS: Conference, Video, Sediment, Stream, Turbidity, Macroinvertebrate, Amphibian, Road, Fish, Oregon
Trask River Contextual Analysis
Jun-05-2007

This document presents brief portraits of various aspects of the Trask River study area. For each portrait, there is more information that can be derived from it however, in an effort to at least provide an initial look at the watershed the narrative was kept brief. For example, the section on geomorphology is evolving with the linkage of the terrain map with the channel gradient map to help us predict where we would expect to find more sediment accumulation. This contextual analysis is meant to help bound expected responses to management given the physical and biological template of the watershed. In the next installment I will look in more detail at the small catchments and how they vary. Some of the salient features of the physical and biological Trask Study landscape are summarized below with the more detailed sections following.

DISCIPLINE: Disciplinary Results    STUDY: Trask    TYPE: Reports    TAGS: Context, Summary of Conditions
WRC Conference Abstracts
Apr-18-2013

Abstracts for (most) of the presentations given at the WRC Conference in April 2013.

DISCIPLINE: Disciplinary Results    STUDY: Alsea, Hinkle Creek, Trask    TYPE: Reports    TAGS: Abstracts, Conference
WRC Conference Agenda
Apr-18-2013

The agenda of the 2013 WRC Conference with presentation titles and speakers listed.

DISCIPLINE: Disciplinary Results    STUDY: Alsea, Hinkle Creek, Trask    TYPE: Reports    TAGS: Agenda, Conference, WRC
Subscribe to Disciplinary Results