OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

Hinkle People

Researchers

Michael Adams

Michael J. Adams, a research ecologist with the U.S. Geological Survey's Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center (FRESC) in Corvallis since 1997, is the principal amphibian investigator for the Hinkle Creek Paired Watershed Study and the Trask Watershed Study. Adams received a Ph. D from the University of Washington in wildlife science in 1997 and B.S. from Colorado State University in wildlife biology in 1992. At FRESC, He is currently addressing issues such as invasive species, disease, land use change, and long-term monitoring design for amphibians in North America.

Kevin Bladon

Kevin Bladon, is an Assistant Professor of Forest Ecohydrology and Watershed Science in the OSU Forest Engineering, Resources, and Management Department. His research program conducts field, laboratory, and modeling research on the impacts of natural disturbance (e.g., wildfire) and land use (e.g., forest harvesting) on hydrology, water quality, and aquatic ecosystem health at the hillslope, stream reach, and small catchment scale in forested headwaters.

Sharon Bywater-Reyes

Sharon Bywater-Reyes is a postdoctoral scholar in the Department of Forest Engineering, Resources, and Management at Oregon State University. As a geomorphologist, she is interested in how Earth surface processes impact people and ecosystems. She is currently taking advantage of the large suite of discharge and sediment data collected through the Watershed Research Cooperative at the Trask, Hinkle, and Alsea watersheds to quantify primary and secondary controls on suspended sediment dynamics in forested headwater streams managed for timber harvest in western Oregon. She received a B.S. Geology from Southern Oregon University (2007), a M.S. Geology from University of Wyoming (2009), and a Ph.D. in Geosciences from University of Montana (2015).  

Nick Cook

Nicholas Cook is a postdoctoral scholar in the Department of Forest Engineering, Resources, and Management at Oregon State University. His research interests focus on the intersection of natural resource management activities and related environmental impacts to watershed systems, water quality, and ecology. Nick's role with the WRC is to examine the large suite of stream temperature data across the Alsea, Hinkle, and Trask paired-watershed studies for changes in thermal regimes in a managed forest setting. He received a B.S. Physics from the University of Mississippi (2004), a M.S. Civil & Environmental Engineering from George Mason University (2008), and a Ph.D. in Biological Systems Engineering from Virginia Tech (2015).  

Kermit Cromack, Jr.

Kermit Cromack, Jr., professor of forest ecosystem studies at the OSU Forest Ecosystems and Society Department, is studying the streamwater chemistry and mapping soils for the Hinkle Creek Paired Watershed Study. He received a Ph.D. from the University of Georgia in 1973, M.A. in 1967 and B.A. in 1963 from the University of Texas. His research interests are in the carbon and nitrogen in the soil and the key nutrients in the water.

Lisa Ganio

Lisa M. Ganio, assistant professor in the OSU Forest Ecosystems and Society Department, is the principal investigator on multidisciplinary, integrated statistical analysis for the Hinkle Creek Paired Watershed Project. She received a Ph.D. in 1989 and M.S. in 1986 in statistics from OSU and B.A. in botany from Humboldt State University in 1982. Her research interests include application of statistical methods; specifically, application hierarchical models in ecology and natural resources, spatial statistics for network data, experimental and study design issues, Bayesian statistics.

Robert Gresswell

Bob Gresswell is an emeritus research biologist with the U.S. Geological Survey’s Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center and affiliate professor in the Department of Ecology at Montana State University.  He has a BS from the University of New Mexico, a MS from Utah State, and a PhD from Oregon State University.  Bob’s research is focused on the factors that influence fish abundance, distribution, and life history within, and among watersheds, and how these relationships change through time.

David Hockman-Wert

David Hockman-Wert, a biologist with USGS FRESC in Corvallis, manages and analyzes the fish distribution and abundance data for the Hinkle Creek study. He received his M.A. in environmental studies from the University of Oregon in 1998 and a B.A. in biology from Eastern Mennonite University in 1991. His multi-disciplinary interests include GIS, landscape ecology, cultural geography and the human dimensions of natural resources.

Judith Li

Judith Li, is a retired associate professor in the OSU Department of Fisheries and Wildlife. She received a Ph.D. in fisheries in 1990 from OSU, M.S. in ecology in 1978 from the University of California at Davis and B.S. in biological sciences in 1966 from the University of California at Berkeley. Her research is most often multidisciplinary, examining stream invertebrate distributions to understand responses to physical and chemical gradients, to fish and avian predation, and as tools in bio-assessment. Following retirement from teaching at OSU she has edited books about science for adults, and written fictional books for children that focus on environmental science.

Arne Skaugset

Arne Skaugset, associate professor in the OSU Forest Engineering, Resources, and Management Department, directs the Watersheds Research Cooperative and is the principal investigator on water quality and hydrology on the Hinkle Creek Paired Watershed Study. In addition to the Hinkle Creek Study, he leads research efforts in the hydrology of forest roads and roaded watersheds, alternative design and environmental performance of aggregate surfaced forest roads, and slope stability. He received a Ph.D. in forest hydrology in 1997, B.S. in Civil Engineering in 1992, M.S. in forest hydrology in 1980 from OSU and B.S. civil engineering in 1977 from Colorado State University. His research interests revolve on finding pragmatic, applied solutions to environmental problems that result from the intensive management of forested terrain.

Matt Sloat

Matt is an aquatic ecologist with broad research interests in the biological and physical processes that influence stream
geomorphology, hydrology, temperature, and aquatic communities. His research is focused on (1) behavioral and
physiological ecology of fish; (2) Pacific salmon life histories and population demography; and (3) linkages between
streams and landscapes and their response to climate change.

Christian Torgersen

Christian Torgersen, a research landscape ecologist with the USGS Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center (FRESC) in Corvallis, is co-principal investigator with Bob Gresswell on the effect of timber harvest on fish abundance and distribution for the Hinkle Creek project. He received advanced degrees in fisheries science from OSU, Ph.D. in 2002, M.S. in 1996 and B.A in geography and German from the University of Oregon in 1993. He is interested in the influences of landscape pattern and habitat fragmentation on the distribution of stream fishes. His research involves the use of geospatial applications, such as remote sensing and GIS, and statistical modeling.

Research Assistants and Biological Technicians

Doug Bateman

Doug Bateman is a Fisheries Biologist for OSU’s Department of Forest Engineering, Resources, and Management. He received his M.S. in fisheries science from OSU in 1998. He is interested in disturbance ecology and the natural history of aquatic organisms.

William Gerth

William Gerth is a Senior Faculty Research Assistant for the OSU Department of Fisheries and Wildlife. He has his M.S. in fisheries from OSU and 13 years of experience collecting and identifying aquatic macroinvertebrates from streams and rivers throughout Oregon for ecological studies.

Alex Irving

Alex is a Faculty Research Assistant in OSU's FERM Department. He has a B.S. in Environmental Studies from Southern Oregon University. On the Trask study, Alex works to ensure site installation, data collection, sample collection and maintenance occurs at the thirteen hydrology stations.

David Leer

David W. Leer, a faculty research assistant for OSU's Department of Forest Engineering, Resources, and Management, leads field crews and conducts year-round fish and invertebrate sampling at Hinkle Creek and Alsea. He received his B.S. in fisheries science from OSU in 2001. His research interests include the natural history of fish and other aquatic organisms as well as the influence of anadromous fishes upon headwater ecosystems.

Amy Simmons

Amy Simmons is a Faculty Research Assistant at OSU's FERM Department. She has a B.S. from Central Washington University and a M.S. from Washington State University.

Outreach and Education

Paul Adams

Paul W. Adams, is a professor and forest watershed extension specialist in the OSU Forest Engineering, Resources, and Management Department, He received his Ph.D. and M.S. in natural resources from the University of Michigan and B.S. in forest management from the University of Vermont. His technical background is in forest soils.

Past Graduate Student

Aaron Berger

Aaron Berger studied conservation biology for his bachelor’s degree (University of Wisconsin) before delving into the technical aspects of fisheries science (MSc. - Oregon State University; PhD - Michigan State University). Aaron has spent the majority of his time developing and applying retrospective and prospective population dynamic models to aid in the management of fish stocks.

Robert "Lance" George

Robert "Lance" George received his M.S. in the OSU Forest Science Department. He assisted Kermit Cromack on the stream water chemistry study at Hinkle Creek.

Kelly Kibler

Kelly Kibler assisted Arne Skaugset on the Hinkle Creek project. She received her B.S. in environmental sciences from the University of North Carolina in 2003. She received her MS Forest Engineering and her PhD Water Resources Engineering from Oregon State University

Niels Leuthold

Niels Leuthold examined the effects of forest management on stream amphibians at Hinkle Creek. He received his Ph.D. and M.S. from OSU, and a B.S. in Evolution and Ecology from the University of California at Davis.

Scott Meininger

Scott Meininger is an engineer for S2O Designs. He has a M.S. in forest Engineering from OSU.

Mark Novick

Mark Novick received his M.S. in the OSU Department of Fisheries and Wildlife and worked under the direction of Bob Gresswell on the fisheries study at Hinkle Creek.

Timothy Otis

Timothy Otis worked under the direction of Arne Skaugset on the Hinkle Creek project. He received his B.S. in civil engineering from Walla Walla College and his M.S. in Forest Hydrology.

Hazel Owens

Hazel Owens worked for NGO's, land trusts, and watershed councils on conservation, restoration, and water quality issues. She has an A.A. in Liberal Arts from Maui Community College, a B.S. in Plant Biology from Portland State University, and a M.S. from Oregon State University.

Nicholas Som

Nicholas Som is a Statistician/Biometrician for USFW who worked with Lisa Ganio, conducting multidisciplinary, integrated statistical analysis at Hinkle Creek. He earned his Ph.D. in forest Science in 2009 from OSU, his M.S. in statistics from Washington State University in 2002, and his B.S. in mathematics from Regis University in 2000. His interests include quantitative methods for stream networks and riparian areas, and more generally, the application of statistical methods to ecological systems.

Nicolas Zegre

Nicolas Zegre is an Assistant Professor of Forest Hydrology at West Virginia University. He received his Ph.D. in 2008 in Forest Engineering (Hydrology) from OSU, his M.S. in 2003 in Forest Resources from the Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University, and his B.S. in 200 in Forest Resource Management from the West Virginia University. His research interests are Watershed and forest hydrology, land use and climate change effects on water resources, forest watershed management, among others.